Reflex Therapeutics Website

Article in Brighton and Sussex Area Argus Newspaper
reproduced for the web:

Saturday, June 28th – Sunday June 29th, 2003

Health

Argus Picture
PICTURE: JIM HOLDEN
PROGRESS: Stroke patient Alan Glassman has regained some
movement in his fingers following treatment from Keith Hall

New Hope for Stroke Patients

GETTING over a stroke can be a long and difficult process but now a new machine could help people on the road to recovery.
SIOBHAN RYAN reports.

Keith Hall is hoping a new form of treatment will help thousands of people with strokes and multiple sclerosis. He is bringing a new type of treatment called Intention Myofeedback Therapy (IMF Therapy®) over from the continent where it has been a success in the treatment of people with nerve damage. The therapy involves the use of a machine which helps improve the neural links between the brain and the affected part of the body and regain function. Mr Hall, a movement therapist, says the non-invasive treatment is simple but effective and hopes it will help some transform some people`s lives. He said; "It may not work for everyone but the results I have seen have been very impressive."

Mr Hall first witnessed the therapy in action whilst living in Germany where he met Ulrich Schmidt, the man who developed the treatment. He was trained to use the machine and to show patients what to do and is now hoping it will be successful in this country.

When a person visualises or imagines making a movement, tiny voltages are produced along nerves towards that part of the body, even when the main motor nerves are not working IMF involves sensing these micro-voltages with conventional skin contact electrodes, then using them to trigger larger voltages in pads attached to the appropriate muscles. This can produce the actual movement. By following a particular regime for a given movement, this approach helps the patient learn and develop new neural routes so they can re-establish control of the muscles. IMF has been found effective not only for recent stroke cases but also for people who have suffered attacks a long time before.

Keith Hall is hoping a new form of treatment will help thousands of people with strokes and multiple sclerosis. He is bringing a new type of treatment called Intention Myofeedback Therapy (IMF Therapy) over from the continent where it has been a success in the treatment of people with nerve damage. The therapy involves the use of a machine which helps improve the neural links between the brain and the affected part of the body and regain function. Mr Hall, a movement therapist, says the non-invasive treatment is simple but effective and hopes it will help some transform some people`s lives. He said; "It may not work for everyone but the results I have seen have been very impressive."

Mr Hall first witnessed the therapy in action whilst living in Germany where he met Ulrich Schmidt, the man who developed the treatment. He was trained to use the machine and to show patients what to do and is now hoping it will be successful in this country.

When a person visualises or imagines making a movement, tiny voltages are produced along nerves towards that part of the body, even when the main motor nerves are not working IMF involves sensing these micro-voltages with conventional skin contact electrodes, then using them to trigger larger voltages in pads attached to the appropriate muscles. This can produce the actual movement. By following a particular regime for a given movement, this approach helps the patient learn and develop new neural routes so they can re-establish control of the muscles. IMF has been found effective not only for recent stroke cases but also for people who have suffered attacks a long time before.